(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Announcements"

Catholic Theological Union 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 
1969-1970 






CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 



■■■M 



CATHOLIC THEOLOGICAL UNION 
AT CHICAGO 




ANNOUNCEMENTS 

1969-1970 



The Franciscans 

Sacred Heart Province 
The Passionists 

Holy Cross Province 
The Servites 

Eastern Province 



5401 South Cornell Avenue 



Chicago, Illinois 60615 
(312) 324-8000 








■■■ . ■ ' - 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 




4 CALENDAR 

5 A MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT 
7 GENERAL INFORMATION 

14 ADMINISTRATION AND FACULTY 

21 STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

25 ACADEMIC PROGRAM 



CALENDAR 1969-1970 



FALL QUARTER, 1969 




September 22-23 


Registration 


September 29 


Opening of the Academic Year 


September 30 


Classes Begin 


October 4 


St. Francis Day 


November 27-30 


Thanksgiving Recess 


December 1 


Registration for winter Quartei 


December 12 


Classes End 


December 17 


Fall Quarter Ends 


WINTER QUARTER, 1970 




January 5 


Registration for New Students 


January 6 


Classes Begin 


February 12 


Servite Founders' Day 


March 2 


Registration for Spring Quarter 


March 13 


Classes End 


March 18 


Winter Quarter Ends 


SPRING QUARTER, 1970 




March 30 


Registration for New Students 


March 31 


Classes Begin 


April 28 


St. Paul's Day 


May 7 


Ascension Thursday 


June 5 


Classes End 


June 10 


Spring Quarter Ends 


June 12 


Final Convocation 



A MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT 



In the fall of 1968 the Catholic Theological Union began its work 
as a school of theology preparing students for the Roman Catholic 
priesthood. It has been an eventful and rewarding year. 

The Catholic Theological Union was conceived as a response to 
the need for seminary education relevant to our day and our world. 
In its purposes, its organization and its location, it fulfills the 
design set forth by educators calling for seminary reform: 
I. Merge and move many present seminaries into clusters or theo- 
logical consortiums. 2. Make every effort to establish at least three 
or four of the very best seminaries alongside an equal number of 
the great secular universities. (The Seminary Protestant and Cath- 
olic. Walter D. Wagoner). 

The Catholic Theological Union combines the resources of several 
religious order seminaries into one autonomous institution. It is 
located in the heart of a great city, at a cultural crossroads where 
ghetto and gold coast, intellectual and illiterate, white conservative 
arid black militant rub shoulders. It is near a renowned university 
and neighbor to several Protestant seminaries. All of this did not 
happen by chance. It was planned precisely in that way. 

Ideals, however, have a way of being modified in their realiza- 
tion. But after this first year of operation, I can list the following 
plus factors: 

1. An ever expanding opportunity for involvement with the human 
community in professional education (field, pastoral, clinical). 

2. The fruitful first steps toward collaboration with sister institu- 
tions in the area. 

3. A refreshing experience (for Catholics) in theological education, 
because of a diversity of programs and multiple electives. 

4. An optimism among the students because of the openness and 
forward-looking stance of the seminary. 

This first year has seen a notable interest in our venture. We have 
received many inquiries about our objectives and first findings. Many 
visitors have come to inspect our school. It has been gratifying to 
learn that our experiment is known literally from coast to coast and 



even abroad. Our introduction to the academic community was 
climaxed on May 2, 1969, when several hundred area scholars and 
students gathered for our Inaugural Convocation, "Bearings For 
Theological Education." 

In 1968 there were students from five orders enrolled at our 
school: Franciscans, Passionists, Servites, Augustinians and Nor- 
bertines. Beginning with the fall quarter, 1969, three additional 
communities will be represented in our ranks: the Society of the 
Divine Word, the Society of the Precious Blood and the Congrega- 
tion of St. Basil. The Catholic Theological Union is indeed a going 
and a growing institution. 

The Catholic Theological Union is an open-ended corporation. 
Our charter makes provision for full membership in the union of 
groups other than the founding communities, Franciscans, Passionists 
and Servites. Membership brings with it the right to a voice in 
school policy through representatives on the Board of Trustees. 
Competent scholars of participating orders have been offered a place 
on our faculty. Those who do not wish to become formal members 
of the CTU can send students on a tuitional basis. But it is hoped 
that eventually many orders will become full members of the cor- 
poration. 

It has been our plan, once we know the eventual size and shape 
of the Catholic Theological Union, to construct an academic facility 
adjacent to the campus. We have the assurance of university authori- 
ties that our presence is most welcome. However, in the present fluid 
state of seminary education we feel that it is best to observe the 
signs of our times and postpone any move that might prove to be 
premature. 

We do feel that the fruitful future of theological education lies in 
the direction we have taken. We hope that others will join us in 
our venture into the future. It has been said that the future belongs 
to him who prepares for it. Effective ministry and the education that 
prepares for it is no exception to that dictum of experience. 



Sincerely yours, 

Paul I. Bechtold, C.P. 

President 

Catholic Theological Union 



GENERAL INFORMATION 




PURPOSE AND HISTORY 



ACCREDITATION 



BUILDING AND LOCATION 



LIBRARY 



CLASSROOM FACILITIES 



ATHLETIC FACILITIES 



FEES 



PURPOSE AND HISTORY 



The Catholic Theological Union at Chicago can truly be called a 
product of Vatican II. The trends in the Catholic Church which 
were reflected in the Council and blessed by it make a new approach 
to seminary training imperative. Both the spirit and the letter of 
such documents as that on Priestly Training, Ecumenism and the 
Church In The Modern World, high-light the necessity of theologi- 
cal training being given in an open and ecumenical setting. 

During the past decade, too, Catholic educators have been in- 
creasingly vocal in pointing out that an isolated, understaffed and 
unaccredited theological seminary cannot possibly give the theologi- 
cal education demanded by the priestly ministry of today and to- 
morrow. In a recent survey, of 381 Catholic major seminaries in the 
United States, 166 (41%) had fewer than 50 students. Increasingly, 
educators have suggested that Catholic seminaries combine their 
resources in library and faculty and if possible move into living con- 
tact with the university and other seminaries. 

Nor has this been exclusively a Roman Catholic concern. Protes- 
tant seminary professors and administrators have long been aware 
of "the problem of the small seminary." In the report, Ministry 
For Tomorrow, the Special Committee on Theological Education of 
the Episcopal Church calls for the re-location of seminaries in an 
urban setting, in contact with seminaries of other faiths, and near 
a university. 

In May, 1964, Cardinal Suenens visited the University of Chicago 
for a series of lectures and ecumenical dialogue. As a result of the 
good spirit engendered by this visit, Dean Jerald Brauer of the 
Divinity School of the University of Chicago met with scholars from 
several Catholic religious orders to discuss the possibility of a Catho- 
lic seminary locating near the campus. Since a move was seen to 
have exciting potential. Besides the Divinity School of the Univer- 
sity, three Protestant theological schools are located on or near the 
campus. The opportunities for scholarly collaboration and ecumeni- 
cal cooperation are at once evident. 

Conversations continued during 1964 and 1965. Three orders 
eventually decided to move to the University of Chicago area: the 



Franciscans of Sacred Heart Province, the Passionists of Holy Cross 
Province, and the Servites of the Midwest Province. 

The Franciscans had conducted St. Joseph Seminary at Teutopolis, 
Illinois, since 1862. The Servite seminary at Lake Bluff, Illinois, 
was successor to the first Servite seminary in Chicago dating from 
1880. The Passionists had begun theological training in St. Louis 
in 1906. 

In January, 1967, Cardinal Cody gave his approval for the estab- 
lishment of a combined seminary of the three orders near the Uni- 
versity of Chicago. An organizational committe now moved plans 
ahead rapidly. Committees for curriculum, spiritual formation, ad- 
ministration and real estate were set up at a joint meeting of the 
three faculties in May, 1967. A Board of Trustees from the three 
orders was selected and on August 25, 1967, elected Rev. Paul I. 
Bechtold, C.P., first president of the school. At a second general 
meeting the shape of the curriculum and problems of staffing were 
settled. Definite structure resulted when the State of Illinois granted 
corporate status to the school in November, 1967, under title of 
The Catholic Theological Union at Chicago. 

Meanwhile intensive real estate search had located several desir- 
able sites in the neighborhood of the University of Chicago. In 
February, 1968, it was decided to purchase the Aragon Hotel, 5401 
Cornell, in East Hyde Park, a location about one mile from the 
campus. This would serve as a temporary home for the Catholic 
Theological Union. Plans call for an academic facility to be con- 
structed at the campus proper a some future time. Title to the 
Aragon was taken in April, 1968. Extensive remodeling over the 
past year has resulted in an excellent adaptation of the building to 
academic and residential use. 

Because of the superb location of the Catholic Theological Union 
and the trend among Catholic seminaries to combine resources and 
move into relationship with the university and seminaries of other 
faiths, there is every reason to believe that this venture will prove 
to be a significant breakthrough in Catholic seminary education. 



ACCREDITATION 

The Catholic Theological Union is incorporated in the State of 
Illinois as an institution of higher learning. The evaluation by the 
Department of Higher Education, State of Illinois, has been satis- 

10 



factorily completed and CTU has been assured that it will be em- 
powered to grant appropriate degrees by State charter. 

A new school must undergo a period of rigorous evaluation and 
self- study before it is granted accreditation. In no instance can a 
school be accredited until one class has passed through its complete 
program and has graduated. 

In June, 1969, the Catholic Theological Union was granted as- 
sociate membership in the American Association of Theological 
Schools, the professional accrediting agency for theological schools. 
While associate membership is not accreditation, it is a preliminary 
step toward that goal. It is hoped that CTU will achieve A ATS 
accreditation in 1971-72. 

A collaborative program, by which a student at CTU can earn the 
degree of Master of Arts in Theology from De Paul University, 
goes into effect in the fall of 1969. This arrangement described on 
page 31, gives CTU students an exciting option in their prepara- 
tion for ministry. 



BUILDING AND LOCATION 

The Catholic Theological Union occupies a nine-story building 
containing some 185 rooms plus lounge areas and dining facilities. 
On the first floor are the receptionist's offices, a large lounge, the 
dining room and other service areas. The administrative offices, 
faculty offices, faculty lounge and seminar rooms are located on the 
second floor. The library and library offices occupy the entire third 
floor. The remaining six floors furnish residence for the faculty and 
students, with individual community chapels and recreational facili- 
ties. 

The Catholic Theological Union is located in the Hyde Park- 
Kenwood area of Chicago's south side. This is a cosmopolitan, vital 
community, with a strong sense of identity. Within walking distance 
are shopping centers, theaters, restaurants, churches, parks, the Lake 
Michigan beaches and the Museum of Science and Industry. Down- 
town Chicago is less than 15 minutes away by car or rapid transit. 
It is close to the University of Chicago and to the several schools of 
theology in the area: Chicago Theological Seminary, Lutheran 
School of Theology and Meadville Theological School. 

11 



It is not required that students reside in the CTU building. One 
group of Franciscans live in an apartment community near the 
school. The Augustinians reside at Mendel High School. Holy Spirit 
Priory in nearby Kenwood serves as the Norbertine residence. A 
seminary which intends moving from its present location might con 
sider purchasing a building of a size to serve its needs in the vicinity 
of CTU. As the school grows it is expected that a variety of resi- 
dential patterns will be established. 



LIBRARY 

The entire third floor of the Catholic Theological Union houses 
the library. The area has been renovated to contain a large reading 
and reference room. Besides offices for the library staff, there are 
cataloging and work rooms. 

The present collection consists of about 60,000 volumes, a com- 
bination of the libraries of the previously independent theologates 
of two of the charter members of CTU. Virtually all of the neces- 
sary periodicals for theological study and related areas of research, 
some 350 in number, are currently being received. 

The proximity of the libraries of the other theological schools in 
the area and of the library of the University of Chicago, especially 
of the Divinity School and the Oriental Institute, affords broad and 
valuable possibilities for consultation and research. 

Students at the Catholic Theological Union enjoy reciprocal library 
privileges with the Lutheran School of Theology, Chicago Theo- 
logical Seminary and Meadville Theological School. 

The library staff consists of two co-directors, trained in both the- 
ology and library science, together with assistants for cataloging 
and circulation. 



CLASSROOMS 

The education building of the Chicago Sinai Congregation is 
located at 5350 South Shore Drive, one block east of CTU. By 
special arrangement one floor of the education building, containing 

12 



eight classrooms, has been made available to CTU. This arrange- 
ment has served well during 1969-70 and will be continued. In addi- 
tion, a number of seminar rooms for smaller groups are located in 
the CTU building. These facilities are adequate for our academic 
needs for the immediate future. 



ATHLETIC FACILITIES 

The Lake Michigan beaches and area parks with golf and tennis 
facilities are in easy walking distance from CTU. An arrangement 
is in effect by which CTU students make use of the Hyde Park 
YMCA athletic facilities, which include swimming pool, gymnasium, 
squash and handball courts. 



FEES 



Tuition $1, 200.00 per year 

400.00 per quarter 

Special Students (for credit or audit) . 100.00 per course 
Student Activity Fee 4.00 per quarter 

Board (September 1 - June 15) 750.00 

250.00 per quarter 

Private Room 750.00 per year 

250.00 per quarter 

Double Occupancy 450.00 per year 

(per person) 

150.00 per quarter 
(per person) 



13 



ADMINISTRATION AND FACULTY 




OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 
BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
DIRECTORS OF FORMATION 
FACULTY 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 



President 

Vice President and Dean 

Secretary and Treasurer 

Registrar 

Co-Directors, Library 



Paul I. Bechtold, C.P. 
Hugh T. McElwain, O.S.M. 

James Hartke, O.F.M. 

Judith M. Hochberg 

Myron Gohmann, C.P. 
Kenneth O'Malley, C.P. 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

Yen' Rev. Vitus Duschinsky, O.F.M. 

Rev. Thomas Keenan, O.S.M. 

Very Rev. Paul M. Boyle, C.P. 

Rev. Mark Hegener, O.F.M. 

Rev. Conleth Overman. C.P. 

Rev. James Hartke, O.F.M. 

Very Rev. Terence O'Connor, O.S.M. 

DIRECTORS OF FORMATION 

Dismas Bonner, O.F.M., J.C.D. 
John Leahy, O.S.M., S.T.D. 

Daniel Malain, C.P., M.A. 



16 



FACULTY 



Ahern, Barnabas, C.P. 

Professor of New Testament Studies 

S.T.L. The Catholic University of America, Washington 

S.S.L. Pontifical Biblical Institute, Rome 

S.S.D. Ibid. 

LL.D. University of Notre Dame (Honorary) 

Behnen, Max, O.F.M. 

Assistant Professor of Moral Theology 

S.T.L. Pontifical Athenaeum "Antonianum," Rome 

S.T.D. Ibid. 

L.G. Ibid. 

Bonner, Dismas, O.F.M. 

Lecturer in Canon Law 

J.C.D. The Catholic University of America, Washington 

J.C.L. Ibid. 

Borntrager, Conrad, O.S.M. 

Assistant Professor of Church History 

S.T.L. Pontifical Theological Faculty "Marianum," Rome 

M.A. (Missiology) The Catholic University of America 

Lie. in Hist. University of Louvain, Louvain, Belgium 

Brennan, Walter, O.S.A. 

Assistant Professor of History of Religions 
M.A. DePaul University, Chicago 

Graduate Studies, University of Chicago 
Ph.D. (Cand.) DePaul University, Chicago 

Crotty, Nicholas, C.P. 

Associate Professor of Moral Theology 

S.T.L. Pontifical University "Angelicum," Rome 

S.T.D. Ibid. 

Cunningham, Thomas, O.S.M. 
Lecturer in Canon Law 

J.C.L. The Catholic University of America, Washington 

J.C.D. Ibid. 

17 



Finnegan, Eugene, O.S.M. 

Assistant Professor of Liturgy and Sacramental Theology 
A.B. Loyola University, Chicago 

M.A. University of Louvain, Belgium 

S.T.L. University of Trier, Germany 

(Cand.) Ibid. 

Fournelle, Geron, O.F.M. 

Professor of Old Testament Studies 

S.T.L. The Catholic University of America, Washington 

L.G. Studium Biblicum Franciscanum, Rome 

S.S.L. Pontifical Biblical Institute, Rome 

Geaney, Dennis, O.S.A. 

Director of Field Education, Lecturer in Ministry 
A.B. Villanova University, Pittsburgh 

M.A. Catholic University of America (Econ) 

Bentley School of Accounting and Finance, Boston 

Gohmann, Myron, C.P. 
Co-Director of Library 
L. Hist. E. Gregorian University, Rome 
A.M.L.S. Rosary College, River Forest, 111. 

Hartke, James, O.F.M. 

Lecturer in Business Ethics 

B.A. Quincy College, Quincy, 111. 

M.B.A. DePaul University, Chicago 

Hayes, Zachary, O.F.M. 

Associate Professor of Doctrinal Theology 

S.T.L. Friederich-Wilhelm University, Bonn, Germany 

Th.D. Ibid. 

Kneis, Gerald, O.S.A. 

Lecturer in Patristics 

B.A. Villanova University, Pittsburgh 

S.T.D. Catholic University of America, Washington 

Langerholz, Callistus, O.F.M. 

Associate Professor of New Testament Studies 
S.T.L. Pontifical Athenaeum "Antonianum," Rome 

S.T.D. Ibid. 
L.G. Ibid. 

18 



Leahy, John, O.S.M. 

Associate Professor of Doctrinal Theology 

S.T.L. Pontifical Theological Faculty "Marianum," Rome 

S.T.D. Ibid. 

Graduate Studies, Loyola University, Chicago 

MacDonald, Sebastian, C.P. 

Associate Professor of Moral Theology 

S.T.L. Pontifical University "Angelicum," Rome 

S.T.D. Ibid. 

Mathis, Marcian, O.F.M. 

Professor of Canon Law 

J.C.L. The Catholic University of America, Washington 

J.C.D. The Catholic University of America, Washington 

McElwain, Hugh, O.S.M. 

Professor of Doctrinal Theology 

S.T.L. Pontifical Theological Faculty "Marianum," Rome 

S.T.D. Ibid. 

Graduate Studies in Education, DePaul University 

Newbold, Thomas, C.P. 

Professor of Pastoral Theology 

Maitre-es-Sc-Med. L'Institut d'Etude Medievale d'Albert le 

Grand 
Ph.D. University of Montreal, Montreal, Canada 

O'Malley, Kenneth, C.P. 
Co-Director of Library 
A.M.L.S. University of Michigan, Ann Arbor 

Ostdiek, Gilbert, O.F.M. 

Associate Professor of Doctrinal Theology 

S.T.L. Pontifical Athenaeum "Antonianum," Rome 

S.T.D. Ibid. 

L.G. Ibid. 

Pawlikowski, John, O.S.M. 

Instructor in Ethics and Ministry 

A.B. Loyola University, Chicago 

Diploma in Jewish Studies, Institute of Jewish Studies, 

Wheeling College 
Ph.D. (Cand.) University of Chicago 

19 



Perelmuter, Hayim Goren 

Visiting Professor of Jewish Studies (1969-1970) 

B.A. McGill University, Montreal 

Advanced Studies: Jewish Institute of Religion, 
New York City; Guggenheim Fellow, Israel; 
Arabic Studies, Harvard University 

D.D. Hebrew Union College, Cincinnati (Hon) 

Praet, Allard, C.P. 

Visiting Professor of New Testament Studies 
S.T.L. The University of Louvain, Belgium 

Schmitt, William, O.F.M. 
Instructor in Homiletics 
B.A. Quincy College 

Graduate Study, Northwestern University 

Stuhlmueller, Carroll, C.P. 

Professor of Old Testament Studies 

S.T.L. The Catholic University of America, Washington 

S.S.L. The Pontifical Biblical Institute, Rome 

S.S.D. Ibid. 

D.H.L. St. Benedict College, (Hon) 



20 



STUDENT ACTIVITIES 




GUIDANCE AND COUNSELLING 



WORSHIP 



STUDENT GOVERNMENT 



STUDENT EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 



GUIDANCE AND COUNSELLING 

The thorough preparation of candidates for the ministry of the 
Catholic priesthood is a task that goes beyond the areas of academic 
and professional instruction. It involves the development of char- 
acter and Christian virtue. Likewise a sense of social responsibility 
must be fostered, bringing the candidate to an awareness of the de- 
mands of selfless service. While this is not the direct responsibility 
of the Catholic Theological Union, it is a matter of notable concern 
for the administration and faculty of the school. 

This facet of the student's development is remanded to the Direc- 
tors of Spiritual Formation of the several participating communities. 
By means of public conferences, group discussion and individual 
guidance sessions, the theologian is assisted in formulating ideals of 
life and service that are essential to commitment in the priestly 
ministry. 

The Directors of Spiritual Formation live in residence with the 
student community. They are available at all times for consultation 
and advice. Care is taken that this service does not produce depend- 
ent persons, but rather promotes full human and spiritual maturity. 



WORSHIP 

An integral aspect of education for ministry is the development 
of a liturgical way of life. The priest is not only a teacher of truth; 
he is president of a worshipping community. Worship in faith has 
ever been considered a necessary adjunct to the fruitful mastery of 
Christian theology. 

At the Catholic Theological Union, the participating communities 
gather for morning and afternoon worship. This consists of liturgi- 
cal prayers, scripture reading, shared reflections, and concelebrated 
Mass. Besides communal worship, students are expected to devote 
time each day to personal reflection and private prayer. 



23 



STUDENT GOVERNMENT 

An important aspect of student activity at CTU is the Student 
Executive Committee. This committee of five students is elected by 
the student body at large. It serves as liaison between student body 
and administration. It represents student viewpoint and interest. At 
the same time, the SEC promotes student activities of an academic, 
religious and social nature. Matters of student discipline affecting 
the°whole school are a responsibility, although not exclusively, of 
the SEC. 

In line with good educational practice, students at CTU place 
elected representatives on the Administrative Council of the School, 
and also on certain key committees such as Curriculum, and Evalu- 
ation and Recruitment. 



STUDENT EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Mr. Patrick Johnson, C.P., Chairman 
Mr. Patrick Reid, O.F.M. 
Mr. Mark Amen, O.F.M. 
Mr. Charles Bowens, O.S.M. 
Mr. Ronald Reneau, C.P. 



24 



ACADEMIC PROGRAM 




ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 

APPLYING EOR ADMISSION 

CURRICULUM 

FIELD EDUCATION 

DEGREE PROGRAMS 

CONSORTIUM 

COURSE OFFERINGS 



ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 



Students applying for admission at the Catholic Theological 
Union must have a bachelor's degree from a recognized college or 
university. Beyond this the Committee on Admissions prefers to 
evaluate "each applicant on an individual basis. An oral interview 
with the prospective student will be required, unless he is sponsored 
by a participating religious community. 

Pre- theological studies are the subject of much discussion and 
revision at the present time. Roman Catholic pre-theological educa- 
tion has alwavs emphasized the need for a strong background in the 
humanities with special emphasis on scholastic philosophy. For the 
larger Christian theological community the Statement on Pre-Semi- 
nary Studies, adopted bv the American Association of Theological 
Schools, furnishes significant guidelines. 

Traditionally, theological schools in America have expected 
their students to prepare themselves for theological study by 
a broad undergraduate program in the liberal arts. When it 
came to a choice of concentration, students were often encour- 
aged to major in classical languages, history or philosophy. 

Today, however, because of the wide range of undergraduate 
programs and majors offered by a great diversity of institu- 
tions of higher education, it is no longer feasible nor realistic to 
demand one particular type of undergraduate preparation as a 
prerequisite for theological study. Some of the ablest students 
in our theological schools have made their decision to prepare 
for the ministry after their undergraduate study was completed, 
or even after a period of time in an occupation apparently un- 
connected with the Church's ministry. 

In every case, the student contemplating theological study 
should correspond at the very earliest opportunity with the 
school or schools to which he intends to apply and with the 
authorities of his church in order to learn what will best pre- 
pare him for the specific program he intends to enter. It is 
the judgment of the AATS that a normative pattern of pre- 
seminary studies will include many of the following: 

27 



English language and literature; history, including non- 
western cultures as well as European and American; philos- 
ophy, particularly its history and methods; natural sciences, 
both the physical and the life sciences; social sciences, where 
psychology, sociology and anthropology are especially appro- 
priate; the fine arts and music, especially for their creative and 
symbolic values; biblical and modern languages; religion, 
both in the Judaeo-Christian and in the Near and Far Eastern 
traditions. 

Some seminaries require Greek or Hebrew for admission, 
and many advanced biblical courses are offered in the original 
tongues; modern languages have an immensely educative role 
and are required at the graduate studies level. 

In many seminaries students who have been well prepared 
in religion and equipped with the tools of theological study 
will be set free, not to complete their theological courses more 
quickly, but rather to pursue more advanced studies. The prin- 
ciple constantly to be kept in mind is not that of satisfying 
paper regulations and minimum requirements, but of making 
the most of opportunities for education. 

This statement, adopted by the Association after considera- 
tion and study by its membership, is issued for the guidance of 
persons considering application to a seminary and their ad- 
visors. In no way does it bind or limit the seminaries in their 
admissions policies. Each seminary is free to set its own en- 
trance and make-up requirements, to add to this statement or 
change its emphases. (AATS, Bulletin 27, June, 1966, pp. 35-6, 
passim.) 



APPLYING FOR ADMISSION 

Students who wish to enroll at the Catholic Theological Union 
should forward the following documents to the office of the Dean 
of Studies at least three months in advance of the beginning of 
classes: 

1) Formal application for admission to be obtained from the Dean's 
office; 

2) Transcripts of all college or academic work after high school, 
including novitiate and summer sessions; 

3) A check or money order in the amount of $10.00 in payment of 
the application fee. 

28 






CURRICULUM 



INTRODUCTION 

Curriculum is an area of continuing thought and imagination in 
any academic program. Curriculum design is still somewhat open at 
the Catholic Theological Union, especially in view of the ongoing 
efforts to develop the variety of programs that are needed in view 
of the diversified student population. Of primary concern at present 
is a curriculum structure that will incorporate both sufficient aware- 
ness of the Church as a historical people and intense efforts at inter- 
pretation of the Christian message in the unique and multifaceted 
human community of today. 

Three general areas of curriculum are central in the thinking of 
our academic community: courses prerequisite to graduate theology; 
graduate theology (represented by both the M.A. and the M.Div.); 
and an integrated Field-Work or Apostolic-Action Program. All 
three areas of concern are reflected in the design of the curriculum. 



FIELD EDUCATION 

Field-Education or Apostolic-Action Programs form an integral 
part of the curriculum for professional ministry. The Director of 
Field Education at the Catholic Theological Union is responsible 
for placing individual students in specific and expertly supervised 
action programs and the Department of Christian Ethics and Min- 
istry is responsible for providing opportunities for theological reflec- 
tion growing out of such programs. 

A variety of possibilities for field education exist in the local 
community (Hyde Park-Kenwood area) and the larger Chicago 
metropolis (e.g., chaplaincies in the hospitals, correctional institu- 
tions, jails; the inner-city apostolate; radio and television communi- 
cations; catechetical and youth counselling programs; various social 
action programs, etc.). 

Each student enrolled in the Master of Divinity program will be 
required to spend at least nine quarter hours in supervised field edu- 
cation programs. 

29 



The integration of in-service training (or interneship) and aca- 
demic programs continues to be the primary challenge in the pro- 
gram for the professional degree in ministry (M.Div.). 



DEGREE PROGRAMS 

The Catholic Theological Union offers two degree programs, the 
Master of Divinity degree (M.Div.), that is, the first professional 
degree in ministry according to the norms laid down by the Ameri- 
can Assoeian of Theological Schools of which CTU is an Associate 
Member) and the M.A. in Theology, the academic graduate degree 
granted by De Paul University in cooperation with the Catholic 
Theological Union. 



MASTER OF DIVINITY (M. Div.) 

The degree of Master of Divinity is the first professional degree 
in ministry. The Master of Divinity requires at least three years of 
theology, covering all the areas of theological education, that is, the 
fields of Biblical Literature, Historical and Doctrinal Studies, and 
Christian Ethics and Ministry. 

CTU is suggesting a program of core courses for the M.Div. 
degree which will be taught every year. There is an equal number of 
seminars offered each year to build a certain flexibility into this 
degree program, since each community and individuals within the 
various communities are engaged in a variety of ministries, and in- 
deed anticipate yet new forms of ministry. 

The Master of Divinity Degree is earned by the successful com- 
pletion of ninety-nine (99) quarter hours of course work with a 
grade average of "C" or better. The courses are detailed as follows: 

1. PREREQUISITE COURSES 30 quarter hours 

Of these, the following distribution is required. 

— 3 courses of BLL (Biblical Studies) 9 quarter hours 

—3 courses of HDS (Historical & Doct.) 9 quarter hours 

— 2 courses from CEM (Ethics & Minist.) . 6 quarter hours 

2 electives 6 quarter hours 

Total 30 quarter hours 

30 



2. GRADUATE COURSES 69 quarter hours 
Of these, the following distribution is required. 

—courses from BLL 18 quarter hours 

-courses from HDS 21 quarter hours 

-^courses from CEM 6 quarter hours 

—elective courses 6 quarter hours 

Total 69 quarter hours 

Finally, the M.Div. candidate is required to present a Master's Paper 
of at least 30 pages, or to take a comprehensive examination drawn 
up by the Committee on Degree Programs. 



MASTER OF ARTS (M.A.) in THEOLOGY 

The Master of Arts Program has been worked out as a coopera- 
tive program between Catholic Theological Union and De Paul Uni- 
versity, the degree being granted by De Paul. In general the Grad- 
uate Program offered by the Department of Theology of De Paul 
University requires: 

1) Completion of forty eight quarter hours of which eight are 
applicable to the thesis. 

a. Twenty-eight quarter hours must include the following 

areas: Scripture (eight quarter hours) ; Doctrinal History 
or Systematic Theology (four quarter hours); Theologi- 
cal Ethics (four quarter hours); Cultural Anthropology 
(four quarter hours); Philosophy, Sociology or Psychol- 
ogy of Religion or Religious Communication (four quarter 
hours) ; Alternative Thought Systems (four quarter hours) . 

b. Twelve hours are in elective courses. 

2) Demonstration of a reading knowledge of one relevant foreign 
language by the completion of the twentieth quarter hour in 
course work. 

3) A Master's Thesis, requiring registration in the appropriate 
courses (e.g. Thesis Research). 



31 



PROGRAM FOR CTU STUDENTS IN THE DE PAUL M.A. 
PROGRAM 

1) PREREQUISITES: 

a. CTU students who wish to enroll at De Paul U. for the 

M.A. in Theology must have completed the prequisite 
courses for graduate work. 

b. Each student who wishes to enroll in the graduate pro- 

gram at De Paul U. must present a letter of recommenda- 
tion to the Dean of the Catholic Theological Union from 
the recognized academic supervisor (Dean or Regent of 
Studies, etc.) of his particular religious community or 
diocese. 

2) REQUIREMENTS FOR THE M.A. IN THEOLOGY. 

a. CTU students registered for the M.A. at De Paul are re- 

quired to take five courses (20 quarter hours) at De Paul; 
the other twenty quarter hours must be taken at CTU. 

b. The Master's Thesis (8 quarter hours) may be written un- 

der the direction of a faculty member from either DePaul 
U. or The Catholic Theological Union. 

c. CTU students must follow the area and course requirements, 

language requirements, etc. as determined by the Graduate 
School of De Paul University. 



CONSORTIUM OF SOUTHSIDE SCHOOLS 

In its 1968 report, the Resources Planning Commission of the 
American Association of Theological Schools lists six metropolitan 
areas in which all the resources for significant theological education 
are already in place. Chicago is one of the areas. 

An especially strong clustering of schools is on the southside, near 
the University of Chicago. Besides the Divinity School of the Uni- 
versity, there are three Protestant seminaries. The Chicago Theologi- 
cal Seminary is interdenominational, with Church of Christ and 
Methodists largest in enrollment. Meadville Theological School 
represents the Unitarian-Universalist tradition. The Lutheran School 
of Theology at Chicago is an official seminary of the Lutheran 
Church in America. The Catholic Theological Union now brings the 
Catholic presence to this area. 

32 



In these days of ecumenism and scholarly collaboration, it is to 
be expected that the southside schools would move toward coopera- 
tive programs. While CTU is conscious that the guidelines to be 
issued by the Bishops Committee on Priestly Formation must give it 
direction, some preliminary and experimental steps in collaboration 
have been taken. There is an agreement by which students at CTS, 
LSTC, Meadville and CTU have library privileges in the several 
schools. Cross registration in selected courses has been made avail- 
able. LSTC and" CTU have sponsored team taught courses with 
students from both institutions enrolled. 

Studies are now underway regarding the feasibility of a formal 
consortium among the southside schools. In one square mile there 
are five schools of theology with over 100 professors and 1000 stu- 
dents. Here indeed are all the resources for the very best in theo- 
logical education. 



COURSE OFFERINGS 

Courses offered during the academic year 1969-70 are listed be- 
low:/ Three departments make up the school of Theology of the 
Catholic Theological Union: The Department of Biblical Literature 
and Languages, the Department of Historical and Doctrinal Studies, 
and the Department of Christian Ethics and Ministry. The courses 
are divided into three series: "100" series (Courses prerequisite to 
graduate work at either the M.A. or M.Div. level); "200" series 
(graduate level courses representing generally the core courses for 
the M.Div. degree); "300" series (graduate level seminars develop- 
ing special questions in biblical, traditional and contemporary the- 
ology). 

N.B. The "100" and "200" series courses are all three quarter- 
hour courses (i.e., three 50-minute classes per week for ten 
weeks); the "300" series are all two quarter-hour courses 
(i.e., two 50-minute classes per week for ten weeks). 



A. DEPARTMENT OF BIBLICAL LITERATURE AND LANGUAGES 
(BLL) 

Staff: Geron Fournelle (Chairman), Barnabas Ahern, Callistus Langerholz, 
Hayim G. Perelmuter, Allard Praet, Carroll Stuhlmueller. 

33 



BLL 100: INTRODUCTION TO THE OLD TESTAMENT 

Select passages from the books and major traditions of the entire Old 
Testament will be studied against the background of Israel's history, 
religion and literary genres. The primary goal of this course is a con- 
trolled knowledge of the Old Testament in preparation for future in- 
depth study of individual sections. STUHLMUELLER 

BLL 105: INTRODUCTION TO THE NEW TESTAMENT 
This course is designed to give the student a comprehensive knowledge 
of the New Testament writings together with an understanding of the 
developing thought and critical problems. PRAET 

BLL 115: CRITICAL INTRODUCTION TO THE BIBLE 

A treatment of the main problems relating to Canonicity, Inspiration and 
hermeneutics. Literary and historical criticism 

FOURNELLE and STUHLMUELLER 



BLL 120: BIBLICAL GREEK 

A course tailored to the need of the students who must refresh their 
knowledge of Biblical Greek. STAFF (LANGERHOLZ) 

BBL 125: INTRODUCTORY HEBREW 

An introductory course for those who have not previously studied 
Hebrew. STAFF (FOURNELLE) 

N.B. Advanced courses in the biblical languages will be offered by the 
department according to the needs of the students. 

BLL 200: HISTORICAL-EXEGETICAL STUDY OF THE 
PENTATEUCH 

Historical background of the Old Testament milieu. Hebrew position in 
the world picture. Exegesis of Genesis 1-11. Patriarchal narratives. 
Exodus event as central to the understanding of the O.T. 

FOURNELLE 



BLL 205: SEMITIC THOUGHT AND CULTURE 

Directed research and class discussion, centering on such elements of 
Israelite daily life as: Hebrew language as related to biblical literature 
and psychology; social life of the people; commerce and industry, labor 
and sports; natural topography, climate and rainfall; etc. 

F ^ STUHLMUELLER 

34 






BLL 210: PRE-EXILIC PROPHECY 

The origin of the "classical" or "writing" prophets in the unique genius 
of Mosaic Religion and in the early prophetic guilds. An exegesis of 
key passages in Amos, Hosea and Jeremiah, to appreciate their particu- 
lar reaction to the religious situation of their own times, and to indicate 
their special contribution to the prophetic movement. 

STUHLMUELLER 

BLL 215: EVOLVING FORM OF PROPHETISM DURING THE 

EXILE AND POSTEXILIC PERIODS 
The salient role of Ezekiel and Deutero-Isaiah during the pivotal period 
of the exile. Later subservience of the prophetic movement to priestly 
legalism or to the apocalyptic form of postexilic Judaism. 

STUHLMUELLER 



BLL 220: THE PSALMS 

The psalms investigated against the background of biblical religion and 
the other eastern religions. Various literary types. The psalms as rep- 
resentative of major religious movements in Israel. STUHLMUELLER 

BLL 225: OLD TESTAMENT WISDOM LITERATURE 

The wisdom movement in Israel and the ancient Near East. Problems of 

the 'wise men.' Retribution considered as thematic to study. 

FOURNELLE 



BLL 230: THE GOSPEL ACCORDING TO MATTHEW 

The teaching of Jesus and the preaching of the early Church about 
Jesus. LANGERHOLZ 

BLL 235: THE GOSPEL ACCORDING TO LUKE 

Early christian traditions about Jesus compared with the other gospels. 

PRAET 

BLL 240: THE GOSPEL ACCORDING TO JOHN 

John's symbolism and thought; his christology, sacramentology, and 

ecclesiology. LANGERHOLZ 

BLL 245: STUDIES IN JOHANNINE LITERATURE 
Exegetical studies on the Apocalypse and letters. The early chriitian 
understanding of salvation history and salvation; 'kosmos' and sin; 
early christian prophetism. LANGERHOLZ 

BLL 250: PAULINE THEOLOGY 

Origin of main Pauline themes in the apostle's personal and judaic 
background as well as in his struggles with the early church. Develop- 
ment of thought in 1-2 Thes., 1-2 Cor., Gal., Rom.. Phil. AHERN 

35 



BLL 255: PAULINE EXEGESIS 

Exegetical studies of Pauline letters. I Corinthians offered. PRAET 

BLL 260: THE THEOLOGY OE BAPTISM AND EUCHARIST IN 
THE GOSPEL OF LUKE 

Within the special setting and purpose of the Gospel, key Lucan passages 
on Baptism and Eucharist will be carefully studied, with the hope of 
formulating the third evangelist's insight into the meaning of these 
sacraments for the community. STUHLMUELLER 

BLL 302: THE HISTORY OF EXEGESIS 

Studies on exegesis of the early Alexandrian school with emphasis on 

hermeneutical principles. LANGERHOLZ 

BLL 304: SEMINAR: THE BIBLE AND TEXTUAL CRITICISM 

History and transmission of the biblical text. Textual errors and their 
correction. Exercises in textual emendation. FOURNELLE 

BLL 306: SEMINAR: CREATIVE REDEMPTION IN DEUTERO- 
ISAIAH 

An indepth study of Is 40-55, emphasizing the transformation of earlier 
redemptive themes or of the prophet's special insights into an announce- 
ment of a new creation. Literary forms in Deutero-Isaiah. 

STUHLMUELLER 

BLL 308: BIBLICAL THEOLOGY OF CREATION 

Important creation texts will be submitted to a careful investigation 
within the evolving thought and liturgy of Israel and the apostolic 
church. Creation will be studied as a 'mystery' of faith within God's 
redemptive designs for his elect. STUHLMUELLER 

BLL 310: DOCTRINAL PREOCCUPATIONS OF THE PASTORAL 
EPISTLES. AHERN 

BLL 312: THE ROLE OF A SACRED MINISTRY IN THE 

APOSTOLIC WRITINGS AHERN 

BLL 314: SEMINAR: CHRIST'S PRIESTHOOD IN THE EPISTLE 
TO THE HEBREWS 

The nature of Christ's priesthood as emerging from the attitude of the 
Epistle to the Hebrews towards Jesus' earthly life and glorification as 
well as towards New Testament worship. AHERN 

BLL 316: THE THEOLOGY OF THE 'WORD OF GOD*' IN 

NT LITERATURE 
Studies on Paul's concept of euaggelion,' 'exousia' and John's 'martyria.' 

LANGERHOLZ 

36 






BLL 318: INTERTESTAMENTAL LITERATURE 

Historico-cultural- religious developments of the period. Jewish apoc- 
alyptic and it's influence on the religious thought of the Jews. Implica- 
tions for New Testament study. FOURNELLE 

BLL 320: LITURGY OF THE SYNAGOGUE 

A survey of worship forms in the contemporary American synagogue 
with special reference to the common thread and variations in the Jewish 
denominations, Orthodox, Conservative and Reform. 

PERELMUTER 



BLL 322: CONTEMPORARY JEWISH THOUGHT 

An overview of the current state of Jewish religious thought and an 

examination of the forces and influences that underlie it. 

PERELMUTER 



BLL 324: READING IN RABBINIC LITERATURE I 

Ethics of the Fathers. Careful examination of a Mishna text which gives 
an insight into Rabbinic thought and methodology. PERELMUTER 

BLL 325: READINGS IN RABBINIC LITERATURE II 

An examination of Rabbinic interpretation and variations on themes 

from the Book of Genesis. PERELMUTER 



B. DEPARTMENT OF HISTORICAL AND DOCTRINAL STUDIES 
(HDS) 

Staff: Zachary Hayes (Chairman), Walter Brennan, Conrad Borntrager, 
Jerome Knies, Eugene Finnegan, John Leahy, Hugh McElwain, Gil- 
bert Ostdiek. 

HDS 100: DOCTRINAL DEVELOPMENT IN THE EARLY 
CHRISTIAN COMMMUNITY 

An analysis of emerging theological themes in the early Church Writers 
and Councils. Special emphasis on Christological and Trinitarian themes. 

McELWAIN 

HDS 105: MEDIEVAL CHRISTIAN THOUGHT 
The course covers the major trends of medieval thought, including mon- 
astic theology, scholastic theologies, the question of reason and revela- 
tion, and the sources in the Middle Ages of some modern schools, the 
school of Chartres, the Augustinians and Aristotelians of Paris, and the 
variety of epistemologies which were there developed. BRENNAN 



37 



HDS 110: CHRISTIANITY IN THE RENAISSANCE AND 
REFORMATION 

Factors influencing the breakdown of the medieval synthesis. Renais- 
sance thought and style chiefly in relationship to the Church. Writings 
of the Reformers, and the position of Trent. BORNTRAGER 

HDS 115: MINISTRY IN THE CHURCH 

Ministry is a function in the Church. To understand ministry one must 
understand the organization in which it operates. This course develops 
a notion of the Church to which its ministry responds. LEAHY 

HDS 120: STUDIES IN PATRISTICS 

Introduction to the science of patristic studies: methodology, and classi- 
fication of patristic sources. Brief thematic survey of earliest patristic 
literature. Detailed critique of selected texts of St. Augustine relative to 
faith-experience and th Christian ascesis. KNIES 

HDS 125: THEOLOGY OF WORSHIP 

An introductory study of the anthropological and theological basis and 
structure of Christian cult and ritual symbolism. OSTDIEK 

HDS 130: THE HISTORY OF CHRISTIAN WORSHIP 
The interplay of Jewish and Hellenistic influences in the creative origins. 
The development of Oriental and Western "Liturgies." The gradual 
codification of the Roman Liturgy. The worship of the Reformation 
Churches. Sects and organized worship. FINNEGAN 

HDS 135: PHENOMENOLOGY OF RELIGION AND THEOLOGY 

An introduction to the study of the History of Religions with emphasis 
upon its relation to theology, its philosophical presuppositions, and its 
methodology. Major importance will be given to the study of the ques- 
tion: What is Theology? BRENNAN 

HDS 205: THEOLOGY AND ANTHROPOLOGY 

The meaning of man as obtained from the study of cultural anthropology, 
philosophical anthropology, and biblical anthropology. Themes: person, 
culture body /soul, spirit, presence, intersubjeetivity, transcendence, and 
religion. BRENNAN 

HDS 215: TRENDS AND TENSIONS IN THE CHURCH IN THE 

19th & 20th CENTURIES 
This course will include a discussion of theological controversies of the 
19th Century and Vatican I: the Church and liberalism, modernism, 
the biblical, liturgical and ecumenical movements of the 20th Century 
and the Church and totalitarian States, especially Nazi Germany. 

BORNTRAGER 



38 



HDS 220: DEVELOPMENT OF CATHOLICISM IN THE U.S. 
Biographical studies. Special problems and achievements of the Amen- 
can g Church. BORNTRAGER 

HDS 230: THE PROBLEM OF GOD 

A detailed study of the meaning of Christian theistic faith in the light 
of the problems raised by contemporary atheism and scientific develop- 
ments. HAYES 

HDS 235: THEOLOGY OF ORIGINS AND ESCHATOLOGY 

An investigation into the question of origins: of cosmos, of man and 
of sin and evil; correlative study of finality: of cosmos, especially of 
its highest achievement, man. McELWAIN 

HDS 240: ANTHROPOLOGY AND CHRISTOLOGY 
The Christian understanding of man as creature and sinner. The rela- 
tion of Christology to the understanding of man and the possibility of 
salvation. HAYES 

HDS 245: THEOLOGY OF THE SPIRIT AND THE CHURCH 

An exploratory study of the relationship between Spirit and Church in 
her being and mission. OSTDIEK 

HDS 250: THEOLOGY OF THE EUCHARIST 

A historico-systematic study of the Eucharist in its liturgical, doctrinal 
and ecclesial dimensions. OSTDIEK 



HDS 255: SACRAMENTS OF INITIATION: 

The New Testament initiatory process, theology and institutions. The 
structures of Christian initiation in the early Eastern and Western 
Churches. The disintegration of these structures and the resultant 
Western theology of bapism and confirmation. The problem of infant 
baptism, physical sacramentalism and the response of faith. 

FINNEGAN 



HDS 260: SACRAMENTS OF HEALING AND VOCATION 

Conversion in the New Testament. Christ, the healer and reconcilar. 
The process from one conversion to many conversions. From public to 
private penitential structures. Prayer for the sick. The scholastic sacra- 
ments of "penitentia" and "extrema unctio": Ecclesial, psychological 
and magical aspects of these sacraments. Marriage as a secular event. 
The scholastic sacrament of marriage. Post-Tridentine attempts to 
legislate on marriage. The laying-on of hands in the New Testament. 
Ordained to perform a specific function. Leadership qualities. 

r FINNEGAN 



39 



HDS 300: THEORIES OF MYTHOLOGY IN PHILOSOPHY 
AND THEOLOGY 

A study of the question of "myth" in religion, with and analysis and 
critique of the theories of Bultmann, Cassirer, Levi-Strauss, Eliade, etc., 
and an historical study of "myth" in the classical Western tradition. 
Problems to be treated: the logic and meaning of myth; myth in culture.; 
myth in the Bible; and myth in today's world. BRENNAN 

HDS 302: THEOLOGICAL METHODOLOGY 

A study of the process of theological reflection, its sources, method, and 
function, as determined by the historical revelation of Christianity and 
the developing awareness of it in the response of the faith-community. 

OSTDIEK 

HDS 306: ECUMENICAL THEOLOGY 

Study of the historical divergences between Christians and the current 

movements of convergence. HAYES 

HDS 310: DOCTRINAL DEVELOPMENT 

Consideration of the trends in the theory of doctrinal development from 
Newman to Vatican II. LEAHY 

HDS 312: PROBLEMS IN SACRAMENTAL THEOLOGY 

Guided study of select liturgical and doctrinal problems in sacramental 

theology. OSTDIEK 

HDS 320: THEOLOGY OF KARL RAHNER 

A study of the philosophical orientation of Rahner and its implication 

in his theological writings. HAYES 

HDS 322: THEOLOGICAL IMPACT OF TEILHARD DE 
CHARDIN 

Discussion of the major writings of Teilhard on the fact of evolution 
and its implications for theology, especially in the areas of beginnings 
and Christology. McELWAIN 

HDS 350: ACTS SEMINAR ON "MAN" 

A study in theological anthropology. What is the nature of man accord- 
ing to reason and faith? What have non-Christian cultures said on this 
point? What have the Ancients said? What do Moderns say? The 
whole question of identity will be considered: Who am I— as a man, as 
a man in 1970, as a man in 1970 in the U.S.A.? 

ACTS STAFF (LOYOLA U.) 

HDS 352: ACTS SEMINAR ON "MAN IN COMMUNITY" 

This will be primarily a study in ecclesiology. What is community? 

What makes community? Discussion of comparative Christian ecclesiol- 

40 



ogies, but in the context of the wider theme of community. Sociology 
and psychology of Personalism will play large roles. How does liturgy 
make community? What is the effect of modern communications media 
on community-building? What was the earliest Christian community as 
we see it in the New Testament ACTS STAFF (LOYOLA) 



C. DEPARTMENT OF CHRISTIAN ETHICS AND MINISTRY 
(CEM). 

Staff: Sebastian MacDonald (Chairman), Max Behnen, Dismas Bonner, 
Nicholas Crotty, Thomas Cunningham, Dennis Geaney, John Leahy, 
Marcian Mathis, Thomas M. Newbold, John Pawlikowski, William 
Schmitt. 

CEM 100: DYNAMICS OF CHRISTIAN CONSCIENCE 
FORMATION 

An attempt to disengage the factors operative in the critical conscience, 
surveying the historical traditions in this regard, and invoking the 
axioms of the behavioral sciences, so as to reach a comprehensive under- 
standing of the Christian conscience which meets the demands and ex- 
pectations of man in his modern predicaments. 

CROTTY-MacDONALD 

CEM 105: SOCIAL DIMENSIONS OF CHRISTIAN EXISTENCE 

'A consideration of man existence in society, covering such topics as 
personalism and organization man, man and the urban situation, politics 
and prophecy, law and protest. PAWLIKOWSKI 

CEM 110: CHURCH AND STRUCTURE 

A study of the development of ecclesiological thought and the various 
attempts to concretize the theory, particularly in legal structures. As a 
consequence, the course will involve historical survey as well as the 
contemporary tensions existing between theory and strucure. 

CUNNINGHAM 

CEM 200: BASIC CHRISTIAN MYSTERIES AND MORAL 
STRUCTURES 

A reflection upon the eschatalogical and incarnational mysteries sustain- 
ing our Christian existence, inferring therefore the implications about 
the origin, development, completion of morality, and its undoing via 
the mystery of sin. MacDONALD 



CEM 205: THE SACREDNESS OF LIFE AS A MORAL ABSOLUTE 
A synthetic overview of the meaning of life in its fullness, with emphasis 
upon its religious nature, so as to discover norms and guidelines serving 
to enlighten current problem areas within biological research and medi- 
cal procedures and practices. MacDONALD 



41 



CEM 210: THEOLOGY OF SEXUALITY 

Changing sexual patterns and thought in America. Meaning of sexuality. 
Marital and premarital sexuality. Particular problems: homosexuality, 
fornication, masturbation. BEHNEN 

CEM 215: LAW CONCERNING THE SACRAMENTS 

A survey of present canonical prescriptions, conciliar norms and pro- 
posed legislation regarding the administration and reception of the 
sacraments. Particular emphasis on matrimonial law and practice. 

MATHIS 

CEM 220: LAW CONCERNING RELIGIOUS PERSONS 

Theological background of religious structures and law, current norms 
of law dealing with religious. Principles and practical aspects of reli- 
gious life, its on -going renewal and adaptation. BONNER 

CEM 225: BASIC TYPES OF PASTORAL COUNSELLING 

A discussion of the basic types of pastoral counselling in terms of goals, 
techniques and practice. A presentation and discussion of some typical 
situations in pastoral care. NEWBOLD 

CEM 230: THE WORD ORALLY INTERPRETED 

Textual analysis and performance dynamics involvement of oral inter- 
pretation of literature applied to Sacred Scripture (homily and reading) . 
Practical experience situations in small group sessions and extramural 
audience confrontations. SCHMITT 

CEM 235: THE LIVING WORD: HOMILY DESIGN AND 
PRACTICE 

Exclusive concentration on homily situation dynamics. Emphasis will 
be on two contemporary situations: the large group homily ("pulpit" 
situation) and the small group homily ("dialogue" homily situation). 
Experimental homily substitutes will be considered and a multi-media 
homily will be attempted. Video-tape will play an important role in 
the homily practice. SCHMITT 

CEM 250: THE ETHICS OF CHRISTIAN MARRIAGE 
Considers the mutual commitment of man and wife in Christian mar- 
riage and the articulation of this commitment in the various facets of 
their life together. CROTTY 

CEM 280, 285, 290: SUPERVISED FIELD EDUCATION 

GEANEY AND STAFF 

CEM 302: PSYCHOLOGICAL LITERATURE ON ETHICS 

The course will explore some of the ethical approaches advocated by 

modern psychologists such as Erikson, Allport, Fromm, Jung, etc. 

PAWLIKOWSKI 



42 



CEM 304: THEOLOGY OF REVOLUTION IN THE SOUTHERN 

SPHERE 
This course will deal with the writings of leaders in the third world 
such as Debray and Fanon. The approach will be both ethical and 
systematic A brief introduction to revolutionary theory will also be 
provided. PAWLIKOWSKI 

CEM 306: EXISTENTIAL PSYCHOTHERAPY AND PASTORAL 
PRACTICE 

The course examines the important influence that existential philosophy 
has come to have upon the development of psychotherapy. Emphasis 
will be placed upon the contributions to psychotherapy made by the 
existentialist analysis and interpretation of individual experience in a 
crisis society. The authors studied will be: Paul Tillich, Ludwig 
Binswanger, Medard Boss, Thomas Hora, F. J. J. Buytendijk, Rollo 
May and Eugen Kahn. NEWBOLD 

CEM 308: PERSPECTIVES ON AND IMPERATIVES FOR 
BUSINESS ETHICS 

The Christian doctrine on rights and duties, developed within a com- 
mercial and financial setting, will be set forth as background for a study 
of current problems and solutions engaging the American business 
community. ' MacDONALD-HARTKE 

CEM 310: RELATIONS BETWEEN GOVERNMENT AND 
RELIGION IN AMERICAN LAW 

A study of the relationship of American church life and structures to 
the principles of the American constitution. Precedent and current in- 
terpretation by the Supreme Court. MATHIS 

CEM 312: SEMINAR: WOMEN AND CULTURE 

Woman's position in the world has changed radically in the twentieth 
century. This course will ask whether the cultural view of women 
recognizes her changing position. LEAHY 

CEM 324: CONTEMPORARY CATHOLIC MORAL 
THEOLOGIANS 

An attempt — through readings, comparisons and discussions — to under- 
stand the basic insights and central themes and problems of some leading 
Catholic moral theologians. Men such as Haring, Curran, Fuchs, 
Schnackenburg and Monden are studied. BEHNEN 

CEM 332: MODERN PROTESTANT AND JEWISH ETHICAL 
APPROACHES 

An examination of the forces that have shaped Protestant and Jewish 
ethical thought in the modern world. Special attention will be given to 
Troeltsch, Barth, Tillich, Bonhoeffer, Martin Buber, H. Richard Niebuhr, 
Reinhold Niebuhr, Richard Rubenstein and Abraham Heschel. 

PAWLIKOWSKI 



43 



CEM 340: LOVE AND COMMUNITY AS ETHICAL AIMS 
An attempt to analyze the meaning of love and community within the 
context of the increasing emphasis which Christian moral doctrine is 
laying on community-oriented and community-creating love. 

CROTTY 

CEM 342: CONTEMPORARY SOCIAL ACTION MOVEMENTS 
A survey and critique of American social movements in which clergy 
have participated. It is an effort to acquaint the student with options 
for action programs. It will include community organizations, business, 
labor, race, peace, student and family movements. Field trips will be 
arranged. GEANEY 

CEM 350: "ACTS" SEMINAR: THE TWO COMMUNITIES 
This will be a study of the relationships of the Church to the State or 
to Society. What is the role of the Church in the civil sphere? In social 
problems? In Government? Should the churches band together to 
form "pressure groups" on government for social and civic progress? 
What is Christian Secularity, Christian Humanism? What is the Min- 
istry of the Church to the World? ACTS STAFF (LOYOLA U.) 

SEM 355: THE CHURCH'S BROADCAST MINISTRY 
Emphasis on the nature of broadcasting, theories of mass communica- 
tion, approaches to religious broadcasting, and the current broadcast 
strategies of the church. Features lectures by broadcasters, theologians, 
and authorities in related fields, with trips to broadcast ceners. (Fall 
quarter) CHICAGO CHRISTIAN COMMUNICATION CENTER 

(DUNN) 

CEM 360: THE PRODUCTION OF RELIGIOUS BROADCASTS 

Students participate in the production of radio and television programs. 
On-the-air experience, as well as exposure to writing and production 
(Prerequisite: CEM 355). 

CHICAGO CHRISTIAN COMMUNICATIONS CENTER 

(DUNN) 

CEM 365: RELIGIOUS STATEMENT THROUGH FILMIC 
REPRESENTATION 

Students study the art of the cinema, view significant documentary and 
experimental films, and make their own individual film statement in an 
effort to discover contemporary visual combinations to the communica- 
tion of the faith. 

CHICAGO CHRISTIAN COMMUNICATIONS CENTER 

(TOWNSEND) 

CEM 380: CLINICAL PASTORAL EDUCATION (CEP) I. 
This is a learning experience in pastoral care. The program requires 
forty hours per week in clinical assignments, theoretical and clinical 
seminars, interdisciplinary conferences, peer group interaction, and per- 
sonal supervision. 

Applications to accredited hospital programs must be made two quar- 
ters in advance. GEANEY 

44 



6 



7 



8 



9 



10 



11 



||||)^^